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Overview

Student Folder Changes Overview - In addition to the above video, we've put together this guide that gives a 1-2 page overview for each section of the student folder (Activate/Summarize, Shared Reading, Word Work, Guided Reading) as well as the Shared Expectations and Burke Reading Interview, which should both be done on the first day of STAIR. Click here or the link above to download and review.


Activate/Summarize

Activate/Summarize - A video will be coming soon explaining this section of the Student Folder that corresponds to the following parts of the Tutor Lesson Plan: Prepare the LessonTutor Notes, and Just For Fun And Fluency. 

Begin and end each day with the Activate and Summarize section. Upon finishing the Guided Reading section of the lesson, and before Fun and Fluency games, use this section in lieu of Tutor Notes in the lesson plan. It will help you combine proven learning strategies with relationship building strategies, allowing for a shared conversation about the learning that has and will take place. It also allows for the incorporation of writing for a purpose, first with the student dictating to the tutor what to write and seeing their ideas go on paper, then taking over the writing process when they feel ready. After the first summary, each lesson can begin with a review of the previous summary to review and “activate” the new learning.

You can read the overview of this section and see a sample worksheet by clicking here.


Shared Reading

Shared Reading - A video will be coming soon explaining this section of the Student Folder that corresponds to the following parts of the Tutor Lesson Plan: Shared/Interactive Reading.

Shared Reading (sometimes referred to as Interactive Reading in the STAIR curriculum) is the first part of each lesson and is a research based practice that includes multiple reads of an engaging, authentic text, over multiple days, in order to get the absolute most out of a shared literacy experience. An authentic text, sometimes called a trade book, is a term meant to distinguish books written for authentic purposes: to entertain, engage, or inform. This is opposed to a text written for the express purpose of teaching or assessing a reading “skill”.

You can read the overview of this section and see additional resources by clicking here.


Word Work

Word Work - A video will be coming soon explaining this section of the Student Folder that corresponds to the following parts of the Tutor Lesson Plan: Sight Words/Vocabulary and Word Study

This section combines the Sight Words/Vocabulary and Word Study portions of the lesson. This is the opportunity to practice the words that make up the majority of texts, as well the phonetic conventions that help us become more efficient readers and writers. The challenging part about Word Work is that it removes reading from the context of an authentic text. This can feel arbitrary and confusing to students, unless the word work is focused on noticing patterns which make reading easier such as rhyming word families (i.e. at, hat, bat, cat), words within words (i.e. batter, kingdom), prefixes, suffixes, contractions, etc. These skills really come in handy when reading compound words, and multi-syllable words, and trying to decode an unknown word in a text. Word work gives students the tools to become more efficient readers and writers, but the point is to make meaning from text while becoming more efficient at recognizing conventions of English. If a student is calling out sight words, or sounding out words flawlessly, but cannot tell you what they read, then it’s time to focus more on meaning. Keep in mind they are also practicing these skills in context during Shared and Guided reading.

You can read the overview of this section by clicking here.


Guided Reading

Guided Reading - A video will be coming soon explaining this section of the Student Folder that corresponds to the following parts of the Tutor Lesson Plan: Guided Reading.

Guided reading is the time for students to practice independent reading, with some guidance. A “just right” guided reading text is one that a student can read about 85-90% of on their own, with a few challenges which will offer opportunities to practice meaning making strategies (see the following Guided Reading Resources).

You can read the overview of this section and additional resources by clicking here.

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